Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
Posted 1 month ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago

drippingwithirony:

mymodernmet:

Louisiana-based photographer Frank Relle captures the nighttime magic of New Orleans in his ongoing series New Orleans Nightscapes. He uses long exposures to capture the feeling of the powerful, haunting beauty throughout his hometown.

I love this city

Posted 2 months ago
Posted 2 months ago
thecivilwarparlor:

World War II -  How The Confederate Flag Made Its Way To Okinawa 

On 29 May, Able Company, Red Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, commanded by South Carolina native Capt Julius Dusenberg, approached to within 800 yards of Shuri Castle. The castle lay within the zone of the 77th Infantry Division, known as the Statue of Liberty Boys. However, GEN Ushijima’s rear guard had stalled the 77 this advance.
Impatient, Maj Gen del Valle ordered Capt Dusenberg to “take that damned place if you can. I’ll make the explanations.” Dusenberg radioed back, “Will do!” Dusenberg’s Marines stormed the stone fortress, quickly dispatching a detachment of Japanese soldiers who had remained behind. Once the casle had been taken, Dusenberg took off his helmet and removed a flag he had been carrying for just such a special occasion. He raised the flag at the highest point of the castle and let loose with a rebel yell. The flag waving overhead was not the Stars and Stripes, but the Confederate Stars and Bars. Most of the Marines joined in the yell, but a disapproving New Englander supposedly remarked, “What does he want now? Should we sing ‘Dixie?’”
MG Andrew Bruce, the commanding general of the 77th Division, protested to the 10th Army that the Marines had stolen his prize. But LTG Buckner only mildly chided Maj Gen del Valle saying, “How can I be sore at him? My father fought under that flag!”
LTG Buckner’s father was the Confederate BG Buckner who had surrendered Fort Donelson to then-BG Ulysses S. Grant in 1862. The Confederate Battle Flag flew only 2 days over Shuri Castle before the Stars and Stripes were formally raised on 31 May. Dusenberg’s flag was first lowered and presented to LTG Buckner as a souvenir. LTG Buckner remarked, “Okay! Now, let’s get on with the war!” Tragically, on 18 June, just days before Okinawa fell, an enemy shell killed LTG Buckner on Mezido Ridge while he was observing a Marine attack.

Author’s Note: Supporting facts may be found in Iving Werstein’s book, Okinawa: The Last Ordeal, Crowell Company. New York, 1968.

http://www.confederatedigest.com/2012/01/planting-confederate-flag-at-snui.html
http://www.greyriderfordixienet.com/the-us-military-and-the-confederate-flag.html

thecivilwarparlor:

World War II -  How The Confederate Flag Made Its Way To Okinawa 
On 29 May, Able Company, Red Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, commanded by South Carolina native Capt Julius Dusenberg, approached to within 800 yards of Shuri Castle. The castle lay within the zone of the 77th Infantry Division, known as the Statue of Liberty Boys. However, GEN Ushijima’s rear guard had stalled the 77 this advance.
Impatient, Maj Gen del Valle ordered Capt Dusenberg to “take that damned place if you can. I’ll make the explanations.” Dusenberg radioed back, “Will do!” Dusenberg’s Marines stormed the stone fortress, quickly dispatching a detachment of Japanese soldiers who had remained behind. Once the casle had been taken, Dusenberg took off his helmet and removed a flag he had been carrying for just such a special occasion. He raised the flag at the highest point of the castle and let loose with a rebel yell. The flag waving overhead was not the Stars and Stripes, but the Confederate Stars and Bars. Most of the Marines joined in the yell, but a disapproving New Englander supposedly remarked, “What does he want now? Should we sing ‘Dixie?’”
MG Andrew Bruce, the commanding general of the 77th Division, protested to the 10th Army that the Marines had stolen his prize. But LTG Buckner only mildly chided Maj Gen del Valle saying, “How can I be sore at him? My father fought under that flag!”
LTG Buckner’s father was the Confederate BG Buckner who had surrendered Fort Donelson to then-BG Ulysses S. Grant in 1862. The Confederate Battle Flag flew only 2 days over Shuri Castle before the Stars and Stripes were formally raised on 31 May. Dusenberg’s flag was first lowered and presented to LTG Buckner as a souvenir. LTG Buckner remarked, “Okay! Now, let’s get on with the war!” Tragically, on 18 June, just days before Okinawa fell, an enemy shell killed LTG Buckner on Mezido Ridge while he was observing a Marine attack.
Author’s Note: Supporting facts may be found in Iving Werstein’s book, OkinawaThe Last Ordeal, Crowell Company. New York, 1968.
Posted 3 months ago

peashooter85:

An ornate 6 shot wheel-lock revolving musket decorated with gold, silver, ivory, and bone.  Originates from Russia, 16th century, possibly restored or added onto in the 18th or 19th century.

(Source: liveauctionworld.com)

Posted 4 months ago

thecivilwarparlor:

Happy Birthday To Fighting Irishman Patrick Cleburne-

Birthday March 17th 1828- And Happy St Patrick’s Day!

Patrick Ronayne Cleburne was born on March 17, 1828, in Ovens, County Cork, Ireland. He was an Anglo-Irish soldier who served in the 41st Regiment of Foot of the British Army. He is, however, best known for his service to the Confederates States of America.

He sided with the Confederacy at the outbreak of the War Between the States and progressed from the rank of private of the local militia to major general.

Cleburne, like many Southerners, did not support the institution of slavery but chose to serve his adopted country out of love for the Southern folks and their quest for independence. In 1864, he advocated the emancipation of Black men to serve in the Confederate Armed Forces. In early 1865, his dream became a reality but it was then too late—the war was lost.

Cleburne participated in the Battles of Shiloh, Richmond, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold Gap and Franklin. He was killed at the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee, on November 30, 1864.

Due to his brilliant strategy on the battlefield Gen. Patrick R. Cleburne was nicknamed “Stonewall Jackson of the West.”

Cleburne said before his death at the Battle of Franklin:

“If this cause, that is dear to my heart, is doomed to fail, I pray heaven may let me fall with it, my face is toward the enemy and my arm battling for that which I know is right.”

http://www.canadafreepress.com/index.php/article/45299